Skip to main content

Improving the effectiveness of immunotherapy for solid cancers

Researchers from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (Monash BDI) are using gene editing and pharmacological approaches to improve the effectiveness of immunotherapies for people with breast and colon cancers.

Professor Tony Tiganis and Professor Nicholas Huntington from the Monash BDI received a $1.78 million grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council to advance their research using chimeric antigen reception (CAR) T-cells and natural killer (NK) cells to combat solid tumours. The team’s preclinical studies demonstrated that deleting immune-regulatory enzymes in CAR T- and NK cells increased their effectiveness against solid tumours such as breast cancer.

‘We have validated the potential for modified CAR T-cells to revolutionise the therapy of solid tumours and believe that, with continued research, we can expand the application of this approach to many different cancers,’ Professor Tiganis said. 

Improving the effectiveness of immunotherapy for solid cancers